Australian & New Zealand Wine Society of Ottawa
July 26, 2014  

 G'day and Kia Ora!

ANZWS Ottawa is a not-for-profit organization devoted to the enjoyment of the wines of Australia and New Zealand. Through exposure to, and education about the wines and wine regions of these great countries, the Society seeks to encourage, in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere, a greater awareness of the wine varietals, the diversity and the styles of Aussie and Kiwi wines.


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 Climate change signals the end of Australian shiraz as we know it

By Jane Wardell, HOBART Tasmania Sun Jul 13, 2014


 

(Reuters) - Young Australian vintner Nick Glaetzer's winemaking-steeped family thought he was crazy when he abandoned the Barossa Valley - the hot, dry region that is home to the country's world-famous big, brassy shiraz.

Trampling over the family's century-old grape-growing roots on the Australian mainland, Glaetzer headed south to the island state of Tasmania to strike out on his own and prove to the naysayers there was a successful future in cooler climate wines.

Just five years later, Glaetzer made history when his Glaetzer-Dixon Mon Pere Shiraz won a major national award - the first time judges had handed the coveted trophy to a shiraz made south of the Bass Strait separating Tasmania from the Australian mainland.

Glaetzer's gamble embodies a major shift in Australia's wine-growing industry as it responds to climate change.

A study by the U.S. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that up to 73 percent of Australian land currently used for viticulture could become unsuitable by 2050.

As the country's traditional wine growing regions including the Barossa, the Hunter Valley and Margaret River grow ever hotter and drier, winemakers are rushing to the tiny island state of Tasmania. Average summer temperatures there are currently about 38 percent cooler than in the Barossa.

Temperatures in Australia's main wine regions are projected to increase by between 0.3 and 1.7 degrees celsius by 2030, according to the CSIRO, Australia's national science agency.

The hotter temperatures would reduce grape quality by 12 to 57 percent, the agency's modeling shows. But in cooler Tasmania, warmer weather could be a benefit because current temperatures can get too chilly for some grape varieties.

Wine makers are so concerned about the impact of global warming on the A$5.7 billion ($5.3 billion) industry that they funded a government-backed experiment in the Barossa vineyards to simulate the drier conditions expected in 30-50 years' time.

For wine lovers, the upshot is that Australia's iconic shiraz is already changing - Glaetzer's version is 15-20 percent lower in alcohol content than its Barossa cousins - and could be unrecognizable in half a century's time.

"If the projections are right, a shiraz in the Barossa in 50 years' time may well taste totally different to what it does at the moment," said Michael McCarthy, the government scientist heading up the Barossa experiment.

Read more on the Reuters site.

 




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Cheers and a big Aussie Aussie Aussie, oi oi oi to you all!


Karina, Brian, Mary, Steve, Gary, Rebecca, Phil, Stuart and Phil.










 

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